Day Of Infamy

It has been eighty years since the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor; an incident which brought the United States into World War II. Americans rushed to recruitment offices in order to avenge the attack, while other hard-working citizens did their best to replenish the American naval fleet and raise money for the war effort.

Sailors, Marines, and Soldiers fought back with extraordinary courage, often at the sacrifice of their own lives. Those without weapons to fight took great risk to save wounded comrades and to save their ships. Pilots took off to engage Japanese aircraft despite the overwhelming odds. Countless acts of valor went unrecorded, as many witnesses died in the attack. Fifteen U.S. Navy personnel were awarded the Medal of Honor — ranging from seaman to rear admiral — for acts of courage above and beyond the call of duty, ten of them posthumously.

I’m a big fan of history, especially World War II, which is why I post about Pearl Harbor every year. There are very few Pearl veterans still with us, and I want to make sure others never forget them and their sacrifices.

Remember

Seventy-nine years ago today, the Empire of Japan attacked Pearl Harbor, Hawaii by air. At the time, it was the deadliest attack on American soil.

At 7:55 a.m. Hawaii time, a Japanese dive bomber bearing the red symbol of the Rising Sun of Japan on its wings appears out of the clouds above the island of Oahu. A swarm of 360 Japanese warplanes followed, descending on the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor in a ferocious assault. The surprise attack struck a critical blow against the U.S. Pacific fleet and drew the United States irrevocably into World War II.

Much of the Pacific fleet was rendered useless: Five of eight battleships, three destroyers, and seven other ships were sunk or severely damaged, and more than 200 aircraft were destroyed. A total of 2,400 Americans were killed and 1,200 were wounded, many while valiantly attempting to repulse the attack.

As of February, there were only two Pearl Harbor survivors alive. We’re losing our World War II heroes at an alarming rate. If you know one, remember to thank them for their service.

Remember Pearl Harbor

Seventy-eight years ago today, Japanese warplanes attacked the U.S. Naval Base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

Of 8 American battleships in the harbor, the attack resulted in 1 destroyed, 2 sunk at their moorings, 1 capsized, 1 beached and 3 damaged but afloat. With the exception of the Arizona (destroyed), all the others were refloated or righted and 6 (Nevada, West Virginia, Tennessee, Maryland, California and Pennsylvania) were repaired and returned to service. While the Oklahoma, which had capsized, was righted, she was never repaired. Additionally, the attack severely damaged 9 other warships, destroyed 188 aircraft, killed 2,403 American servicemen, and 68 civilians. (H/TWikipedia)

Just as we should never forget the September 11th attacks, we should never forget the attack of December 7th, 1941. And, in the same vein, we should never let our country become as vulnerable as we did on those two tragic days.

Day Of Infamy

Seventy-seven years ago today, the Empire of Japan attacked the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. A staggering 2,335 were killed – nearly half from the crew of the USS Arizona.

In the wake of the attack, 15 Medals of Honor, 51 Navy Crosses, 53 Silver Stars, four Navy and Marine Corps Medals, one Distinguished Flying Cross, four Distinguished Service Crosses, one Distinguished Service Medal, and three Bronze Star Medals were awarded to the American servicemen who distinguished themselves in combat at Pearl Harbor. Additionally, a special military award, the Pearl Harbor Commemorative Medal, was later authorized for all military veterans of the attack.

The day after the attack, Roosevelt delivered his famous Infamy Speech to a Joint Session of Congress, calling for a formal declaration of war on the Empire of Japan. Congress obliged his request less than an hour later. On December 11, Germany and Italy declared war on the United States, even though the Tripartite Pact did not require it. Congress issued a declaration of war against Germany and Italy later that same day.

Five ships were sunk, thirteen were damaged, and the United States was drawn into World War II.

We Remember

Seventy-six years ago today, Japanese warplanes attacked the U.S. Naval Base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

Of the 60,000 U.S. personnel caught in the attack, it is believed there are less than two thousand still alive. We’re losing our WWII heroes.

Of 8 American battleships in the harbor, the attack resulted in 1 destroyed, 2 sunk at their moorings, 1 capsized, 1 beached and 3 damaged but afloat. With the exception of the Arizona (destroyed), all the others were refloated or righted and 6 (Nevada, West Virginia, Tennessee, Maryland, California and Pennsylvania) were repaired and returned to service. While the Oklahoma, which had capsized, was righted, she was never repaired. Additionally, the attack severely damaged 9 other warships, destroyed 188 aircraft, killed 2,403 American servicemen, and 68 civilians. (H/T Wikipedia)

Just as we should never forget the September 11th, 2001 attacks, we should never forget the attack of December 7th, 1941. And, in the same vein, we should never let our country become as vulnerable as we did on those two tragic days.

Remember

attack-on-pearl-harbor

Seventy-five years ago today, the Empire of Japan attacked U.S. naval forces in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

Just before 8 a.m. on December 7, 1941, hundreds of Japanese fighter planes attacked the American naval base at Pearl Harbor near Honolulu, Hawaii. The barrage lasted just two hours, but it was devastating: The Japanese managed to destroy nearly 20 American naval vessels, including eight enormous battleships, and more than 300 airplanes. More than 2,000 Americans soldiers and sailors died in the attack, and another 1,000 were wounded.

The day after the assault, President Franklin D. Roosevelt asked Congress to declare war on Japan; Congress approved his declaration with just one dissenting vote. Three days later, Japanese allies Germany and Italy also declared war on the United States, and again Congress reciprocated.

Montana Congresswoman Jeanette Rankin was the lone dissenter. Apparently the news of 2,000 murdered Americans was not enough for her to violate her conscience.

May God bless and keep those who perished that fateful day.

Day Of Infamy

USS Arizona ExplodesSeventy-four years ago today, the Empire of Japan declared war on the United States by attacking the Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor.

The attack commenced at 7:48 a.m. Hawaiian Time. The base was attacked by 353 Japanese fighter planes, bombers, and torpedo planes in two waves, launched from six aircraft carriers. All eight U.S. Navy battleships were damaged, with four sunk. All but Arizona were later raised, and six were returned to service and went on to fight in the war.

The Japanese also sank or damaged three cruisers, three destroyers, an anti-aircraft training ship, and one minelayer. 188 U.S. aircraft were destroyed; 2,403 Americans were killed and 1,178 others were wounded. Japanese losses were light: 29 aircraft and five midget submarines lost, and 64 servicemen killed.

I’ve posted about Pearl Harbor every day for the last ten years because 1. I think it’s important to remember, and 2. I believe it was the day America truly changed forever.